Kategorie-Archiv: PhD Dancing Age(ing)

lecture performances 2017

Photo Annika Fredriksson

-upcoming September 2017, Searching for the Fountain of Age – a danced lecture, Colloquium on
Artistic Research in Performing Arts (CARPA), Theatre Academy and the
Academy of Fine Arts of the Uniarts Helsinki, Finnland

-7 July 2017, Improvising Age(ing) or dancing around the fountain of youth and the
fountain of age – a danced lecture and workshop, Dance & Somatic
Practices Conference, Centre for Dance Research (C-DaRE) Coventry
University, UK

-29 June 2017, Dancing Age(ing) as Artistic Research, Embodied Practice and Artistic Research: Debating European Artistic Doctorates in Dance and Performance, Seminar organised by Artistic Doctorates in Europe (ADiE), RESEARCH PAVILION: UTOPIA OF ACCESS, Biennale di Venecia 2017, Research Pavilion, Theatre Space

-29 April 2017, Dancing Age(ing): Strategies for Rethinking Age(ing) in Contemporary
Dance, ENAS Conference: Cultural Narratives, Processes and Strategies
in Representations of Age and Aging, University of Graz, Austria

Photo: Annika Fredriksson

lecture performances 2016

Photo: Lars Åsling

– 7 Dec 2016, Performing Age(ing): Sliding through Time – a danced lecture, Academy of Music and Drama, University of Gothenburg, Sweden

-1 Dec 2016, Performing Age(ing): Sliding through Time – a danced lecture, SITE, artistic platform and production house for contemporary performing arts, Stockholm, Sweden

-29 Nov 2016, Performing Age(ing): Sliding through Time – a danced lecture, swedish research council’s symposium on artistic research, Linnaeus University Växjö, Sweden

 

Doctor D meets Doctor V (2016)

Susanne Martin and Alex Nowitz

Premiere: July 7, 2016, at festival Improvisation Xchange Berlin – berlin arts united at Dock 11, Berlin
Duration: 60 min

An interdisciplinary dialogue between two artistic research projects, one based in dance, the other in voice/live electronics
(spoken language English)
In this three-part performance Susanne Martin and Alex Nowitz each share, explain, and perform aspects of their respective research for the other and for the audience. Susanne’s research “Dancing Age(ing)” rethinks age(ing) critically in and through improvisation practice and performance. With “The Multi-Vocal Voice” Alex traces the potentialities for the contemporary performance voice without and with technological means, i.e. live electronic instruments. Finally they enter into a duet improvisation in which they allow their ideas and modes of performing to merge, interact and possibly inspire each other.

lecture performances 2013

21. November 2013: Werkstattgespräch kulturelle Generationenarbeit, Berlin
Titel: 18800 Bewegungen und 1000 Worte, an deren Ende wir alle 30 Minuten älter sein werden – Ein getanzter Vortrag

12. October 2013: Symposium of Society for Dance Research at Middlesex University. London ‚New Visions on Dance‘
Titel: Dancing Age(ing): An improvisation-based performance of 18800 movements and 1000 words during which we grow 30 minutes older

12.-14. September 2013: 4. Werkstattgesprächs des Interdisziplinären Arbeitskreises Ambivalenz
„Ambivalenz und soziale Praxis“ Inter- und intrapersonale Potenziale ambivalenter Erfahrungen
Institut für Soziologie, Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität Münster
Titel: Performing the Ambiguity of Age(ing) – Ein getanzter Vortrag

6. – 9. June 2013: ‚Tanzkongress‘ im Tanzhaus Düsseldorf
Titel: Dance in a Critical Discourse on Ageing / Tanz im kritischen Diskurs über das Altern
Respondent: Katherine Mezur

1. June 2013: ‚Contact Samstag‘ – One festival day with  CI classes, outstanding CI teachers, evening jam, organic food, chill out, lecture, discussions
Titel: The Fountain of Youth: Dance in a Critical Discourse on Ageing

The research project Dancing Age(ing) (in spring 2013)

Summary
My PhD research engages with the premise that Western artistic dance can be seen as holding an interesting multi-layered position in relation to age(ing). On one hand, it most often focuses on youthful physicality and therefore takes part in an unquestioned marginalisation of ageing bodies, which, according to critical age studies (Woodward 1999, Gullette 2004, Lipscomb/ Marshall 2010), pervades Western culture as a whole. On the other hand, it is a potential site of experiencing and presenting human bodies in new and unexpected ways. Therefore dance may also enable ways of appreciating our bodily being beyond a narrow focus on athleticism and an attractiveness, which is commonly assured by youthfulness.
My research focuses on improvisation-based dance making. My main argument is, that improvisation-based dance forms and their specific working methods may offer ways of practicing and performing dance that have the potential to challenge previously unquestioned understandings of age(ing) in the field of dance and possibly beyond.
The research unfolds from the hypothesis that it needs an in-depth engagement with the practice of improvisation-based dance and the working conditions negotiated in the practice to reveal if and how such an age-critical potential might be realised. My research approach, therefore, uses artistic practice as the primary mode of enquiry, interacting with and framed by an analysis of other artists’ approaches and the theoretical insights of critical age studies, which challenge dominant representations of the ageing body, a stereotypical understanding of the life course, and a gendered bias in regard to the social impact and consequences of getting older.
So far my research, approached as an evolving embodied Practice as Research mode of enquiry in dance, is realised by actively intertwining three distinct but interdependent modes of research engagement.
1. Modes of Artistic Enquiry
I have developed ‘Solo Partnering’ as a long-term improvisational studio practice and ‘Performing Age(ing)’ as a specific choreographic process. Both practices grapple with the theme of age(ing) creatively whilst further offering propositions for re-thinking working methods/ structures for mid-life dance artists.
2. Modes of Documentation
Through a detailed written practice logbook and video documentation of my working processes and performances I have implemented documentation methods that trace the practice and allow me to reconstruct and reflect the steps taken in my practical enquiry of Solo Partnering and Performing Age(ing) in the written part of the thesis.
3.  Modes of Contextual and Theoretical Reflection
The development of a critical, reflective position towards my research subject allows me to articulate the presumptions, creative strategies and age critical potential inherent in/ developed by my artistic practice. This critical position is gained through examining critical age studies, other artists’ approaches, relevant literature on dance, as well as through interviews with acclaimed older dance makers, participant observations and the on-going drafting of ideas and questions arising throughout the research process.